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  • Elisha Byskov posted an update 1 week, 5 days ago

    You may be down in the dumps at the moment, but take solace in the fact that you’re definitely not the first one to have your heart broken. When you need an inspirational pick-me-up, listen to these wise words about heartbreak.Heartbreak is a universal experience that comes with intense emotional anguish and distress.While many people associate a broken heart with the end of a romantic relationship, therapist Jenna Palumbo, LCPC, emphasizes that “grief is complicated.” The death of a loved one, job loss, changing careers, losing a close friend — all of these can leave you brokenhearted and feeling like your world will never be the same.There’s no way around it: healing a broken heart takes time. But there are things you can do to support yourself ความรัก through the healing process and protect your emotional wellbeing.Give yourself permission to grieveGrief is not the same for everyone, says Palumbo, and the best thing you can do for yourself is to give yourself permission to feel all of your sadness, anger, loneliness, or guilt.“Sometimes by doing that, you unconsciously give those around you permission to feel their own grief, too, and you won’t feel like you’re alone in it anymore.” You just might find that a friend’s gone through similar pain and has some pointers for you.Take care of yourselfWhen you’re in the midst of heartbreak, it’s easy to forget to take care of your personal needs. But grieving isn’t just an emotional experience, it also depletes you physically. Indeed, research has shown that physical and emotional pain travel along the same pathways in the brain.Deep breathing, meditation, and exercise can be great ways to preserve your energy. But don’t beat yourself up over it, either. Simply making an effort to eat and stay hydrated can go a long way. Take it slow, one day at a time.Lead the way in letting people know what you needEveryone copes with loss in their own way, says Kristen Carpenter, PhD, a psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.She advises being clear about whether you prefer to grieve privately, with the support of close friends or with a wide circle of people accessible through social networks.